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Publication Details

Title :

Is Virtual Reality Surgical Performance Influenced by Force Feedback Device Utilized?

Journal:

J Surg Educ.

Impact Factor:

2.302

Authors:

Bugdadi A1, Sawaya R2, Bajunaid K3, Olwi D4, Winkler-Schwartz A2, Ledwos N2, Marwa I2, Alsideiri G5, Sabbagh AJ6, Alotaibi FE7, Al-Zhrani G7, Maestro RD2.

Affiliations:

1 Neurosurgical Simulation Research and Training Centre, Department of Neurosurgery and Neurology, McGill University, Montreal, QC, Canada; Department of Surgery, Faculty of Medicine, Umm Al-Qura University, Makkah Almukarramah, Saudi Arabia. Electronic address: Abdulgadir.Bugdadi@mail.mcgill.ca.

2 Neurosurgical Simulation Research and Training Centre, Department of Neurosurgery and Neurology, McGill University, Montreal, QC, Canada.

3 Neurosurgical Simulation Research and Training Centre, Department of Neurosurgery and Neurology, McGill University, Montreal, QC, Canada; Division of Neurosurgery, Faculty of Medicine, University of Jeddah, Jeddah, Saudi Arabia.

4 Neurosurgical Simulation Research and Training Centre, Department of Neurosurgery and Neurology, McGill University, Montreal, QC, Canada; King Abdullah International Medical Research Center, Ministry of National Guard Health Affairs, Jeddah, Saudi Arabia.

5 Neurosurgical Simulation Research and Training Centre, Department of Neurosurgery and Neurology, McGill University, Montreal, QC, Canada; Department of Surgery, College of Medicine, Sultan Qaboos University, Muscat, Oman.

6 Neurosurgical Simulation Research and Training Centre, Department of Neurosurgery and Neurology, McGill University, Montreal, QC, Canada; Division of Neurosurgery, Department of Surgery, Faculty of Medicine, King Abdulaziz University, Jeddah, Saudi Arabia; Clinical Skill and Simulation Center, King Abdulaziz University, Jeddah, Saudi Arabia.

7 Neurosurgical Simulation Research and Training Centre, Department of Neurosurgery and Neurology, McGill University, Montreal, QC, Canada; National Neuroscience Institute, Department of Neurosurgery, King Fahad Medical City, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia.

Year of Publication:

2018

DOI:

10.1016/j.jsurg.2018.06.012

Abstract:

Objectives:
The study objectives were to assess if surgical performance and subjective assessment of a virtual reality simulator platform was influenced by changing force feedback devices.

Design :
Participants used the NeuroVR (formerly NeuroTouch) simulator to perform 5 practice scenarios and a realistic scenario involving subpial resection of a virtual reality brain tumor with simulated bleeding. The influence of force feedback was assessed by utilizing the Omni and Entact haptic systems. Tier 1, tier 2, and tier 2 advanced metrics were used to compare results. Operator subjective assessment of the haptic systems tested utilized seven Likert criteria (score 1 to 5).

Setting:
The study is carried out at the McGill Neurosurgical Simulation Research and Training Centre, Montreal Neurological Institute and Hospital, Montreal, Canada.

Participants :
Six expert operators in the utilization of the NeuroVR simulator platform.

Results:
No significant differences in surgical performance were found between the two haptic devices. Participants significantly preferred the Entact system on all 7 Likert criteria of subjective assessment.

Conclusion:
Our results show no statistical differences in virtual reality surgical performance utilizing the two bimanual haptic devices tested. Subjective assessments demonstrated that participants preferred the Entact system. Our results suggest that to maximize realism of the training experience educators employing virtual reality simulators may find it useful to assess expert opinion before choosing a force feedback device.