Publication Details

Title :

Outcome of pediatric acute kidney injury: a multicenter prospective cohort study.

Journal:

Pediatr Nephrol.

Impact Factor:

2.516

Authors:

Kari JA1, Alhasan KA2, Shalaby MA3, Khathlan N4, Safdar OY3, Al Rezgan SA5, El Desoky S3, Albanna AS6.

Affiliations:

1 Pediatric Nephrology Center of Excellence, Department of Pediatrics, King Abdulaziz University, PO Box 80215, Jeddah, 21589, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia. jkari@kau.edu.sa.
2 Pediatrics Department, College of Medicine, King Khalid University Hospital, King Saud University, Riyadh, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia.
3 Pediatric Nephrology Center of Excellence, Department of Pediatrics, King Abdulaziz University, PO Box 80215, Jeddah, 21589, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia.
4 Intensive Care Unit, Department of Pediatrics, King Abdulaziz University, Jeddah, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia.
5 King Fahad Armed Forces Hospital, Jeddah, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia.
6 King Abdullah International Medical Research Center, King Saud Bin Abdulaziz University for Health Sciences, Jeddah, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia

Year of Publication:

2017

DOI:

10.1007/s00467-017-3786-1

Abstract:

BACKGROUND:

Acute kidney injury (AKI) is a common problem encountered in critically ill children with an increasing incidence and evolving epidemiology. AKI carries a serious morbidity and mortality in patients requiring admission to a pediatric intensive care unit (PICU).

METHODS:

We undertook a prospective cohort study of PICU admissions at three tertiary care hospitals in the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia over 2 years. The Kidney Disease Improving Global Outcomes (KDIGO) definition was used to diagnose AKI.

RESULTS:

A total of 1367 pediatrics PICU admissions were included in the study. AKI affected 511 children (37.4%), with 243 children (17.8%) classified as stage I (mild), 168 patients (12.3%) stage II (moderate), and 100 children (7.3%) were classified as stage III (severe). After adjustment for age, sex, and underlying diagnosis, in-hospital mortality was six times more likely among patients with AKI as compared to patients with normal renal function (adjusted OR: 6.5, 95% CI: 4.2-10). AKI was also a risk factor for hypertension (adjusted OR: 4.1, 95% CI: 2.8-5.9) and prolonged stay in the PICU and hospital, as it increased the average number of admission days by 10 (95% CI: 8.6-11) days in the PICU and 12 (95% CI: 10-14) days in the hospital.

CONCLUSIONS:

One-third of PICU admissions were complicated with AKI. AKI was associated with increased hospital mortality and the length of stay in both PICU and hospital.