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Publication Details

Title :

Association between β-blocker use and mortality in critically ill patients: a nested cohort study.

Journal:

BMC Pharmacol Toxicol.

Impact Factor:

2.288

Authors:

Al Harbi SA1, Al Sulaiman KA1, Tamim H1,2, Al-Dorzi HM3, Sadat M3, Arabi Y4.

Affiliations:

1 Pharmaceutical Care Department, King Abdulaziz Medical City, King Saud bin Abdulaziz University for Health Sciences, King Abdullah International Medical Research Center, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia.

2 Department of Internal Medicine, American University of Beirut- Medical Center, Beirut, Lebanon.

3 Intensive Care Department, MC 1425, King Abdulaziz Medical City – National Guard Health Affairs, King Saud bin Abdulaziz University for Health Sciences, King Abdullah International Medical Research Center, PO Box 22490, Riyadh, 1426, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia.

4 Intensive Care Department, MC 1425, King Abdulaziz Medical City – National Guard Health Affairs, King Saud bin Abdulaziz University for Health Sciences, King Abdullah International Medical Research Center, PO Box 22490, Riyadh, 1426, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia. arabi@ngha.med.sa

Year of Publication:

2018

DOI:

10.1186/s40360-018-0213-6.

Abstract:

BACKGROUND:
β-blockers have several indications in critically ill patients and are commonly used. The aim of this study is to examine the relationship between the use of β-blockers in critically ill patients and mortality.

METHODS:
This was a nested cohort study in which all medical-surgical ICU patients (N = 523) enrolled in a randomized clinical trial of intensive insulin therapy (ISRCTN07413772) were grouped according to β-blocker use during ICU stay. To account for the indication of β-blockers, we constructed a propensity score using selected clinically-relevant and statistically-significant variables related to β-blocker exposure and outcome. The primary endpoints were all-cause ICU and hospital mortality. Secondary endpoints were the development of severe sepsis during ICU stay, ICU and hospital length of stay, and mechanical ventilation duration. Using multivariable models, we adjusted the associations of β-blockers and these outcomes to the propensity score.

RESULTS:
Of the 523 patients enrolled in the study, 89 (17.0%) received β-blockers during their ICU stay. There were no significant associations between β-blocker therapy and ICU mortality (adjusted odds ratio [aOR] 1.56, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.83-2.9, P = 0.16), hospital mortality (aOR 1.09, 95% CI 0.99-1.20, P = 0.73), the risk of ICU-acquired severe sepsis (aOR 1.67, 95% CI 0.95-2.97, P = 0.08), mechanical ventilation duration (P = 0.17), or ICU length of stay (P = 0.22). However, β-blocker use was associated with increased ICU and hospital mortality among nondiabetic patients (aOR 2.93, 95% CI 1.19-7.23, and 2.43, 95% CI 1.05-5.64, respectively).

CONCLUSIONS:
Our study showed that β-blockers during the ICU stay had no significant association with mortality or morbidity. However, β-blocker therapy was associated with increased mortality in non-diabetic patients.