Publication Details

Title :

Quality of life reported by survivors after hospitalization for Middle East respiratory syndrome (MERS)

Journal:

Health Qual Life Outcomes.

Impact Factor:

2.278

Authors:

Batawi S1, Tarazan N2, Al-Raddadi R3, Al Qasim E4, Sindi A1, Al Johni S5, Al-Hameed FM6, Arabi YM6, Uyeki TM7, Alraddadi BM8.

Affiliations:

1 King Abdulaziz University, Jeddah, Saudi Arabia.

2 King Faisal Specialist Hospital and Research Center, Jeddah, Saudi Arabia.

3 Department of Community Medicine, King Abdulaziz University, Jeddah , Saudi Arabia.

4 King Abdullah International Medical Research Center, King Abdulaziz Medical City – National Guard Health Affairs, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia.

5 King Saud Bin Abdulaziz University for Health Sciences, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia.

6 King Abdullah International Medical Research Center, King Saud bin Abdulaziz University for Health Sciences, Intensive Care Department, King Abdulaziz Medical City – National Guard Health Affairs, Jeddah , Saudi Arabia.

7 Influenza Division, National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Diseases, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, Georgia, USA.

8 Department of Medicine, King Faisal Specialist Hospital and Research Center, University of Jeddah, P.O BOX 40047 Jeddah 21499 MBC J 46, Jeddah, Saudi Arabia.

Year of Publication:

2019

DOI:

10.1186/s12955-019-1165-2.

Abstract:

INTRODUCTION:
Data are lacking on impact of Middle East Respiratory Syndrome (MERS) on health-related quality of life (HRQoL) among survivors.

METHODS:
We conducted a cross-sectional survey of MERS survivors who required hospitalization in Saudi Arabia during 2016-2017, approximately 1 year after diagnosis. The Short-Form General Health Survey 36 (SF-36) was administered by telephone interview to assess 8 quality of life domains for MERS survivors and a sample of survivors of severe acute respiratory infection (SARI) without MERS. We compared mean SF-36 scores of MERS and non-MERS SARI survivors using independent t-test, and compared categorical variables using chi-square test. Adjusted analyses were performed using multiple linear regression.

RESULTS:
Of 355 MERS survivors, 83 were eligible and 78 agreed to participate. MERS survivors were younger than non-MERS SARI survivors (mean ± SD): (44.9 years ±12.9) vs (50.0 years ±13.6), p = 0.031. Intensive care unit (ICU) admissions were similar for MERS and non-MERS SARI survivors (46.2% vs. 57.1%), p = 0.20. After adjusting for potential confounders, there were no significant differences between MERS and non-MERS SARI survivors in physical component or mental component summary scores. MERS ICU survivors scored lower than MERS survivors not admitted to an ICU for physical function (p = 0.05), general health (p = 0.01), vitality (p = 0.03), emotional role (p = 0.03) and physical component summary (p < 0.02).

CONCLUSIONS:
Functional scores were similar for MERS and non-MERS SARI survivors. However, MERS survivors of critical illness reported lower quality of life than survivors of less severe illness. Efforts are needed to address the long-term medical and psychological needs of MERS survivors.