Publication Details

Title :

Use of Pharmacogenetic Drugs by the Dutch Population

Journal:

Nutrients

Impact Factor:

4.196

Authors:

Wani K1, Yakout SM2, Ansari MGA3, Sabico S4, Hussain SD5, Alokail MS6, Sheshah E7, Aljohani NJ8, Al-Saleh Y9,10,11,12, Reginster JY13,14, Al-Daghri NM15.

Affiliations:

1 Chair for Biomarkers of Chronic Diseases, Department of Biochemistry, College of Science, King Saud University, Riyadh 11451, Saudi Arabia. wani.kaiser@gmail.com.

2 Chair for Biomarkers of Chronic Diseases, Department of Biochemistry, College of Science, King Saud University, Riyadh 11451, Saudi Arabia. sobhy.yakout@gmail.com.

3 Chair for Biomarkers of Chronic Diseases, Department of Biochemistry, College of Science, King Saud University, Riyadh 11451, Saudi Arabia. ansari.bio1@gmail.com.

4 Chair for Biomarkers of Chronic Diseases, Department of Biochemistry, College of Science, King Saud University, Riyadh 11451, Saudi Arabia. eaglescout01@yahoo.com.

5 Chair for Biomarkers of Chronic Diseases, Department of Biochemistry, College of Science, King Saud University, Riyadh 11451, Saudi Arabia. danishhussain121@gmail.com.

6 Chair for Biomarkers of Chronic Diseases, Department of Biochemistry, College of Science, King Saud University, Riyadh 11451, Saudi Arabia. msa85@yahoo.co.uk.

7 Diabetes Care Center, King Salman Bin Abdulaziz Hospital, Riyadh 12769, Saudi Arabia. eman_shesha@hotmail.com.

8 Specialized Diabetes and Endocrine Center, King Fahad Medical City, Riyadh 12231, Saudi Arabia. najij@hotmail.com.

9 Chair for Biomarkers of Chronic Diseases, Department of Biochemistry, College of Science, King Saud University, Riyadh 11451, Saudi Arabia. alaslawi@hotmail.com.

10 College of Medicine, King Saud bin Abdulaziz University for Health Sciences, Riyadh 22490, Saudi Arabia. alaslawi@hotmail.com.

11 King Abdullah International Medical Research Center, Riyadh 11481, Saudi Arabia. alaslawi@hotmail.com.

12 Department of Medicine, Ministry of the National Guard-Health Affairs, Riyadh 14611, Saudi Arabia. alaslawi@hotmail.com.

13 Chair for Biomarkers of Chronic Diseases, Department of Biochemistry, College of Science, King Saud University, Riyadh 11451, Saudi Arabia. jyr.ch@bluewin.ch.

14 Department of Public Health, Epidemiology and Health Economics, University of Liège, 4000 Liège, Belgium. jyr.ch@bluewin.ch.

15 Chair for Biomarkers of Chronic Diseases, Department of Biochemistry, College of Science, King Saud University, Riyadh 11451, Saudi Arabia. aldaghri2011@gmail.com

Year of Publication:

2019

DOI:

10.3390/nu11061405.

Abstract:

There are discrepancies in the reports on the association of metabolic syndrome (MetS) and its components with bone mineral density (BMD) and hence more population-based studies on this subject are needed. In this context, this observational study was aimed to investigate the association between T-scores of BMD at lumbar L1-L4 and full MetS and its individual components. A total of 1587 participants (84.7% females), >35 years and with risk factors associated with bone loss were recruited from February 2013 to August 2016. BMD was done at L1-L4 using dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA). T-Scores were calculated. Fasting blood samples and anthropometrics were done at recruitment. Fasting lipid profile and glucose were measured. Screening for full MetS and its components was done according to the National Cholesterol Education Programme Adult Treatment Panel III (NCEP ATP III) criteria. Logistic regression analysis revealed that the odds of having full MetS increased significantly from the lowest T-score tertile to the highest one in both sexes (OR, odd ratio (95% CI, confidence interval) of tertile 2 and 3 at 1.49 (0.8 to 2.8) and 2.46 (1.3 to 4.7), p = 0.02 in males and 1.35 (1.0 to 1.7) and 1.45 (1.1 to1.9), p < 0.01 in females). The odds remained significant even after adjustments with age, body mass index (BMI), and other risk factors associated with bone loss. Among the components of MetS, only central obesity showed a significant positive association with T-score. The study suggests a significant positive association of T-score (spine) with full MetS irrespective of sex, and among the components of MetS this positive association was seen specifically with central obesity.