Publication Details

Title :

The effect of endothelial cell activation and hypoxia on placental chorionic mesenchymal stem/stromal cell migration

Journal:

Placenta

Impact Factor:

2.759

Authors:

Balta Al-Sowayanabc, Rosemary J. Keoghab, Mohammed Abumareecd, Harry M. Georgiouab, Bill Kalionisab

Affiliations:

a University of Melbourne, Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Royal Women’s Hospital, Parkville, Victoria, 3052, Australia

b Pregnancy Research Centre, Department of Maternal-Fetal Medicine, Royal Women’s Hospital, Parkville, Victoria, 3052, Australia

c Stem Cells and Regenerative Medicine Department, King Abdullah International Medical Research Center, King Abdulaziz Medical City, Ministry of National Guard Health Affairs, Mail Code 1515, P.O. Box 22490, Riyadh, 11426, Saudi Arabia

d College of Science and Health Professions, King Saud Bin Abdulaziz University for Health Sciences, King Abdulaziz Medical City, Ministry of National Guard Health Affairs, Mail Code 3124, P.O. Box 3660, Riyadh, 11481, Saudi Arabia

Year of Publication:

2017

DOI:

https://doi.org/10.1016/j.placenta.2017.06.341

Abstract:

Introduction
Chorionic mesenchymal stem/stromal cells (CMSC) can be isolated from the placenta in large numbers. Although their functions are yet to be fully elucidated, they have a role in tissue development and repair. To fulfil such a role, CMSC must be able to migrate to the microenvironment of the injury site. This process is not fully understood and the aim of this study therefore, was to examine in vitro CMSC migration in response to tissue inflammation and hypoxic conditioning.

Methods
CMSC were derived from the chorionic villi. A trans-endothelium migration (TEM) assay was used to study CMSC migration through an activated endothelial cellmonolayer using the HMEC-1 cell line. A cytokine array was used to identify and compare the cytokine production profile of activated versus non-activated HMEC-1.

Results
There were significant changes in cytokine production by HMEC-1 cells following lipopolysaccharide (LPS) treatment and hypoxic conditioning. Despite this, results from the TEM assay showed no significant change in the average number of CMSC that migrated through the LPS activated HMEC-1 layer compared to the untreated control. Furthermore, there was no significant change in the average number of CMSC that migrated through the HMEC-1 monolayer when exposed to hypoxic (1% O2), normoxic (8% O2) or hyperoxic (21% O2) conditions.

Conclusion
These data suggest that cell functions such as transendothelial migration can vary between MSC derived from different tissues in response to the same biological cues.